Downloading: Evaluation of the Health Impacts of Lead Pollution from the Surface Waters of the Djiri River by Crossing Hazard and Vulnerability Issues (Republic of Congo)
International Journal of Science and Research (IJSR)

International Journal of Science and Research (IJSR)
www.ijsr.net | Open Access | Fully Refereed | Peer Reviewed International Journal

ISSN: 2319-7064



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Evaluation of the Health Impacts of Lead Pollution from the Surface Waters of the Djiri River by Crossing Hazard and Vulnerability Issues (Republic of Congo)

NGOUBOU Roch Corneille, DINGA Jean Bienvenu et NGANGA Dominique

Abstract: The objective of this study is to assess the health impacts of air pollution of the Djiri River on the populations of the area covered by the Djiri health district. The Djiri area north of Brazzaville is growing in population and the presence of industrial facilities that can produce toxic emissions can compromise the health of residents. This study follows a previous study that diagnosed the presence of lead in the waters of the Djiri River at levels (average annual pollution) above the WHO guide value (Norme 2006). Health data collected based on cardiovascular and respiratory diseases was carried out at five health centres in the Djiri Health District and assessed both the damage caused to the population by leaded Djiri water, to apply two scenarios of health risk coverage conceptualized for determining health gains. No mortality was observed in health centres, but the following cases of morbidity are observed: -20050 cases of morbidity in high blood pressure in 2016 including 8659 cases in women versus 11391 cases in men; -20537 cases of morbidity in high blood pressure in 2017 including 9534 cases in women versus 11,003 cases in men; -17730 cases of morbidity in acute respiratory infection in 2016 including 8243 cases in women compared to 9487 cases in men; -19867 cases of morbidity in acute respiratory infection in 2017 including 8350 cases in women compared to 11517 cases in men; Overall, there were 40587 cases of morbidity in high blood pressure compared to 37597 cases of morbidity in acute respiratory infection over the period 2016-2017. Meeting WHO's recommendations for short-term lead would lead to a health gain for the Djiri Health District each year of: - 1673 cases of morbidity in high blood pressure; - 1550 cases of morbidity in acute respiratory infection. In the long term, for a decrease in the average annual degree of lead pollution of 0.01 mg/l, the potential health gain is estimated at 18 cases of morbidity in high blood pressure avoided per year and 17 cases of morbidity in acute respiratory infection avoided per year. Of the total cases of mordibility observed (78184 cases), 28853 in the Djiri River and Kintel Central areas are considered as cases attributable to water pollution as the use of the Djiri River waters by populations in these areas and 49331 cases other areas of the Djiri Health District are considered to be cases likely due to pollution of the djiri River waters since these areas are a little further from the Djiri River.

Keywords: Metal Pollution, MERISE and Information System, WHO Water Quality Standards, Health Events, Health Impacts, Health Indicators



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